Annual Leave

Your annual leave entitlement is based on continuous length of service as detailed in the ‘Entitlement Table’ below.

Teachers & Associated Professionals annual leave information is available here.

The leave year will be from 1 January to 31 December, all leave must be taken within the period 1 January of the year to which it relates and 31 January of the following year. Any leave not taken by 31 January of the following year will be forfeited.

The entitlement to annual leave and public holidays as expressed below applies to five day working patterns. For alternative working patterns, holiday entitlements will be calculated to achieve equivalent leave.

Further guidance on Annual Leave can be found in Schedule A.

Entitlement Table

CONTINUOUS SERVICEANNUAL LEAVE ENTITLEMENT
Less than 5 years26
5 but less than 7 years32
7 but less than 10 years33
10 but less than 12 years34
12 but less than 15 years35
Over 15 years36

Public Holidays

In addition to annual leave, employees shall be entitled to 6 public holidays, i.e.

  • First two working days of year
  • Good Friday
  • Easter Monday
  • Christmas Day or the next working day
  • Boxing Day or the next working day

Annual Leave Entitlement Allocation

Annual leave entitlement is allocated in hours in your myself account and you can calculate your entitlement as follows:

  • From the entitlement table, determine how many days leave you are entitled to.
  • Then multiply the number of days by either 7 (if your post FTE hours are 35) OR by 7.4 (if your post FTE hours are 37 hours).
  • Divide this number by either 35 hours or 37 hours (the FTE hours for your post)
  • Finally, multiply this figure by your contracted weekly hours and this will give you your annual leave entitlement in hours.

Example: 26 days (less than 5 years service) x 7 (post FTE hours are 35) = 182, 182 / 35 hours (FTE hours for post) = 5.2, 5.2 x 25 hrs (contracted weekly hours) = 130 hours annual leave entitlement.

Guidance on requesting annual leave via mySelf can be found here.

Updated on 25th October 2019

Was this article helpful?

Related Articles